Steven Spielberg Remembers It For You Wholesale

readyplayeroneOne of the greatest moments in Steven Spielberg’s filmography appears late in his 2001 work A.I. Artificial Intelligence, in which the robot child David, a broken-down simulacrum of an ideal son, comes face to face with the talisman that had given him hope of becoming a real boy. The mythical blue fairy he’d so desperately wished for, derived from Disney’s The Adventures of Pinocchio, turns out to be little more than a chintzy statue, wasting away lifelessly at the bottom of a dark ocean. It’s an incredibly moving scene, at once reckoning with childhood and the dreams we have manufactured for us, and it finds a filmmaker forging into middle age with a thrilling sense of exploration and uncertainty. By contrast, the 2018 Spielberg appears to have succumbed to the cultural amnesia of the present; an older man with a scrambled sense of his past, stuck in a regressive nostalgia loop that yearns, like some indiscriminate Philip K. Dick algorithm, to remember pop culture for its audience wholesale. Continue reading

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The Square: Comfort Food for the Self-Loathing

thesquareFew things excite well-meaning liberal audiences more than being scolded for their bourgeois attitudes, and in Swedish filmmaker Ruben Östlund’s The Square, which charts the unravelling of a blithe gallery curator’s comfortable existence, they’re served up an art-house platter of guilt and chin-stroking class critique. That the film won the coveted Palme d’Or at last year’s Cannes Film Festival is no surprise, while its nomination for this year’s Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards all but sealed its middlebrow credentials. Despite its considerable smarts – and this is a clever, fitfully hilarious work – The Square faces a classic festival-film dilemma: it’s art that threatens to resemble the very subject of its critique, indulging its smug audience with a knowing sense of collusion. Continue reading