Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird

ladybirdLike her literary hero Joan Didion, Greta Gerwig hails from Sacramento, California, and has always worn her West Coast idiosyncrasy as part of her distinct charm as a performer. Emerging from the “mumblecore” scene of the mid 2000s, she was briefly (and fatuously) feted as Hollywood’s next quirky ingenue, before reshaping her trajectory by co-authoring 2012’s exuberant Brooklyn blast Frances Ha with her collaborator and partner, director Noah Baumbach. Lady Bird is her first film as sole director, a loosely autobiographical, unexpectedly tender coming-of-age piece that returns Gerwig, with a vivid sense of time and place, to her hometown. Continue reading

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Thunder Down Under: Taika Waititi on Thor: Ragnarok

taikathor

There’s a wonderful moment midway through Marvel’s Thor: Ragnarok, in which our hero shares a traumatic childhood memory with his brother and frequent enemy Loki: the time the latter tried to kill him by transforming into a snake. It’s rambling and absurd but also strangely poignant, with a clear rapport between the actors that’s unlike almost anything in the studio’s slickly oiled machine. Unsurprisingly, it was also improvised on set between Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston and director Taika Waititi, who spun the tale off the cuff like the fanciful father he played in his breakout film, Boy (2009). Continue reading

Uneasy appeasement in Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Killing of a Sacred Deer

killingsacreddeerThe Greeks sure understand the wrath of whimsical gods. According to ancient myth, the goddess Artemis was so affronted by King Agamemnon accidentally bumping off one of her pet deer that she ordered the latter to sacrifice his eldest daughter, Iphigenia, by way of appeasement (which might seem excessive, until you realise he was messing with the Mistress of Animals). Depending on which version of the story you encounter, the King either goes through with the grim deed or Artemis saves the princess by switching her for an animal at the last moment. In others, such as filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos’ reworking (now showing nationally), Iphigenia is heard to incant Ellie Goulding’s ‘Burn’ – the pop hit’s joyous chorus whispered in defiant mockery of Daddy’s indifference to her fate. Continue reading